Book Marketing Plan: Part Three (Tip #8)

MARKETING PLAN (PHASE 3)

 

9. Setup website: design well and link to other sites. Virtual Tours Track the hits. Newsletters.

 

10. Newspapers:

    a) Aim for free publicity in hometown and nationally by associating the arc of the book    and making it relevant to some aspect of society

     b) Doing the same in magazines and other media

 

11. Interviews:

a)      Newspapers

b)      Radio

c)      T.V.

d)     Magazines

e)      Literary Journals

f)       Local Newspapers

g)   Internet Promotion

h)  Colleges/Universities

 

12. Advertise:

a)      Publisher’s Weekly

b)      Kirkus Reviews

c)      Poets & Writers

d)     Local/National Newspapers

e)      Bookwire: www.bookwire.com         Majordom@bookzone.com 

f)       Links to Websites

g)      T.V./Radio

h)      Website for the novel

 i)   Book signing parties (bookstores/homes)

 j)   Flyers/newletters/tear-offs/postcards/bookmarkers

 k)  Visit Bookstores and do follow-up calls: (check position of book)

       

13. Reviews:

a)      Publisher’s Weekly

b)      Kirkus Reviews

c)      Nationally known newspapers

d)     Borders/Barnes & Noble

e)      Amazon.com

 

14. Workshops/Lectures:

a)      Workshops in hometown colleges and universities/Nationally

b)       Readers Groups

c)       Libraries

d)      T.V./Radio

e)      Organizations

Book Marketing Plan: Part Two (Tip #8)

BOOK MARKETING (PHASE 2)

 

a)      Fundraisers

b)      Gift stores

c)      Clothing and accessory stores

d)     Restaurants

e)      Retail outlets with like topics

f)       Retirement Communities

g)      Libraries (public/university/college)

h)      Organizations  (Charitable and otherwise)

i)        Venue That Has Theme Related to the Book

n)  Clubs

o)  Community Centers   etc.

    

6. Promotion & Publicity (Press Packet to Include):

a)      Blurb about the book

b)      Photo of book cover and author

c)      Cover letter/Press releases

d)     Biographies of author

e)      Previous articles about author/book

f)       Reviews/testimonials

g)      Book or Galley/Sample chapters

h)      Relevant facts about the book

i)        Relevant facts about the author

j)        Video cassette or audio tapes (where appropriate)

k)   Book Signings (bookstores/homes/businesses)

l)   Personal appearances and lectures

n)  Local/national tours

 

7. Interviews: (all types of media)

a)      How book conceived and why

b)      Choice of title

c)      Origins

d)     What life and job experiences were brought into the book

e)      Influences in life brought to book

 

8. Giveaways/Promotion:

a)      Books/Bookmarks

b)      T-shirts

c)      Posters

d)     Bulk mailing

e)      Links to websites

f)       Book & Trade Shows

g)      Newsletters

h)   Testimonials Testimonials From Writers and People in Important       Positions    

Book Marketing Plan: Part One (Tip #7)

BOOK MARKETING PLAN

1.  Give novel data/ Name, number of words, page length:

a)      Category of novel

b)      Publishers and initial run

c)      Publication date

 

2. Audience (Target your audience):    

 

3. Brief synopsis of book (small paragraph):

 

4. Distribution: 

a)      Examples: Access Publishers Network

b)      Associated Publishers Group

c)      Amazon.com

d)     Bookazine

e)      Consortium Book Sales

f)       Ingram Distributors

g)      Taylor and Baker Books

h)      Book Catalogues

i)        Independent Book Stores

j)        Chain Book stores

k)      Direct Mail

l)        Sales Reps

m)    Wholesalers

n)      Book Exhibitions

 

5. Other Venues for Promoting Books:

a)      Corporate and Charitable Outlets (sell and promote)

b)      Book Club Rights

c)      Book Clubs

d)     Home Shopping Network

Tip #06

SELL BOOKS.

               ** IT’S ABOUT YOUR OWN CREATIVITY: 

Publishing Niche Markets are more manageable – get your mind and pocket around it.

NICHE ENABLES YOU TO TARGET YOUR SALES MESSAGE AND GIVE GREATER PRICISION.   (IN SOME INSTANCES THERE IS A POOL OF ADVERTISERS

-Challenges and opportunities.

GENRE:  (DEFINE TERMS OF FICTION & NON-FICTION)

-General Category:  Fiction     Non-fiction 

-Literature: Genres as the novel, short story, epic poem, lyric poem fall in boundaries of literature.

-Fiction: Narrative usually in the form of a novel or short story – tells an imaginative story – “untrue” and can’t be verified. More logic then fact.

-Non-fiction: presents historical or biographical fact.

-Novel: Fictional narrative of considerable length. Range/style and type. TV/film in competition with novels but remains viable but threatened.

  Fiction  (HARDER SELL) within fiction is genre: 

-Romance:  contemporary, historical, harlequin with guidelines, bodice rippers, etc.  Very loosely a narrative characterized by exotic adventure rather than a realistic depiction of character and scene usually associated with the novel.

-Mystery, thriller/suspense, detective, hard-boiled cop,  etc. An expectant uncertainty  concerning the outcome of plot.  EXAMPLE:  Detective story may resort to sudden disappearance of key characters OR: Introduction of clues that implicate innocent peop[le keeping final solution just out of sight.

-Mainstream – Appeals to a wide audience.  Is a commercial novel that can easily embody literary concepts or not. 

Literary:  More emotional/psychological – usually character driven as opposed to plot driven. Ulysses by James Joyce. Marquez  In The Time of Cholera

– Children’s books/teen markets

– Memoir  (written like fiction)  (I think it’s somewhere between fiction and non-fiction

 -Non-Fiction:  (non-fiction vs. creative non-fiction)

-Cookbooks

-Travel Guidebooks

-How to books (very popular – even to how to make a better cake – hence, Martha

-Business books 

Tip #05

PROMOTING YOUR BOOK

No matter if you are with a big publishing house, a small press, self-published, internet, print-on-demand or seeking publishing, you must understand how to promote your own book.  As a relative unknown in the publishing world (either publishing your first book or even a second book without a large selling track record) you will be largely ignored when it comes to marketing.  This applies to all aspects of publishing from big publishers to printing-on-demand.  It is necessary to know how market yourself.

Elements in Promotion:

Marketing Plan

Reviews

The Necessity of Distributors

Dealing with Chain and Independent Book Stores

Readings and Book Signings in the traditional mode and untraditional

Promotion and Publicity

Press Packets

Interviews: Radio, TV, Book Clubs, Organizations, etc. 

Finding the Elements in Your Story With Relevance to Elements in Society

Giveaways

Websites

Advertising

Testimonials

Tip #04

WORKSHOP FOR CREATIVE WRITING

ELEMENTS OF STRUCTURE  (elements necessary to carry your story):

Character Development

Time and Place

Creating Scenes/Chapters

Exposition

Dialogue

Description

Point of View

Use of Senses

Development of Plot

Use of Details

Emotion

Use of Suspense

Developing Surprises

Balancing all Elements to Produce a Dynamic Story

Tip #3

One rule of thumb in writing, particularly in fiction, that I adhere to is learning structure in writing. Would you trust a doctor to operate on you if he/she didn’t have a working knowledge of anatomy? Well, I liken that to writing – structure, structure, structure. Once you learn the elements of dialogue, narration, point of view, description, setting, time & place, etc. and the balance between all of these elements, you are off to a flying start whether you write non-fiction, literary or commercial fiction.  

There are visual images that need to be addressed such as white space on a page. In today’s world, there is a greater push for white space (tends toward commercial) rather than dense words on every page (tends toward literary). Again, balance enters into this. Think of your audience. If writing more commercial fiction then give your reader more white spaces, less description. Even in literary pieces, people raised on speed in computers, texting and iPads easily tire of long passages that go on and on about the landscape. Readers like to get to the story quickly and absorbed in the conflict that ensues whether it is physical or psychological or both. And don’t forget CONFLICT! That is the heart of your story.

 

There should also be adherence to reality – what motivates people in real life and how does that translate into fiction. Study human behavior for an understanding of human behavior even if writing commercial fiction. 

 

That is not to say you can’t experiment, but you need understanding of structural elements in order to innovate. Like great artists who have gone experimental, almost always they can do realistic work first. Picasso did realistic portraits before his famous bombastic pieces.

Fiction Writing Workshop (Structure For Memoir As Well)

FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (STRUCTURE FOR MEMOIR AS WELL) 

1)      Dissecting Structure –

a)      Plotting (Arc and Spine of Story)

b)      Dialogue

c)      Narrative

d)     Inner Narrative

e)      Scenes

f)       Sequel

g)      Details

h)      Descriptions

i)        Setting

j)        Use of Senses

k)      Time and Place

l)        Character Development and Deepening (Application of Myth Busting)

m)    Emotions

n)      Background of Characters

o)      Flashbacks

p)      Percentages of Dialogue to Narrative (rule of thumb: 50% + for commercial, 33% for literary)

q)      Making Every Word Count

r)       Foreshadowing

s)       Keeping Secrets

t)       Hurdles/Problems for Protagonist to Solve (One Step Forward and Three back)/

u)      Secondary Characters

v)      Sub-Plots

w)    Climax

x)      Epiphany (“Aha” Concept), Character Changes

Tip #1

One rule of thumb in writing, particularly in fiction, that I adhere to is learning structure in writing. Would you trust a doctor to operate on you if he/she didn’t have a working knowledge of anatomy? Well, I liken that to writing – structure, structure, structure. Once you learn the elements of dialogue, narration, point of view, description, setting, time & place, etc. and the balance between all of these elements, you are off to a flying start whether you write non-fiction, literary or commercial fiction.

There are visual images that need to be addressed such as white space on a page. In today’s world, there is a greater push for white space (tends toward commercial) rather than dense words on every page (tends toward literary). Again, balance enters into this. Think of your audience. If writing more commercial fiction give your reader more white spaces, less description. Even in literary pieces, people raised on speed in computers, texting and iPads easily tire of long passages that go on and on about the landscape. Readers like to get to the story quickly and absorbed in the conflict that ensues whether it is physical or psychological or both. And don’t forget CONFLICT! That is the heart of your story.

There should also be adherence to reality – what motivates people in real life and how does that translate into fiction. Study human behavior for an understanding of human behavior even if writing commercial fiction. 

That is not to say you can’t experiment, but you need understanding of structural elements in order to innovate. Like great artists who have gone experimental, almost always they can do realistic work first. Picasso did realistic portraits before his famous bombastic pieces.